ground clearance – Motostays http://motostays.com/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 06:29:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://motostays.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png ground clearance – Motostays http://motostays.com/ 32 32 Retro review: relive our 2003 Automotive Solutions AS One Reviews 2022 drive https://motostays.com/retro-review-relive-our-2003-automotive-solutions-as-one-reviews-2022-drive/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 05:04:24 +0000 https://motostays.com/retro-review-relive-our-2003-automotive-solutions-as-one-reviews-2022-drive/ This review was first published in issue 114 of Top Gear magazine (2003) Just a few years ago, racing around a disused bus garage in a go-kart with a lawn mower engine was pretty much the only way for most of us to experience the thrill of driving on racetrack. Advertising – Page continues below […]]]>

This review was first published in issue 114 of Top Gear magazine (2003)

Just a few years ago, racing around a disused bus garage in a go-kart with a lawn mower engine was pretty much the only way for most of us to experience the thrill of driving on racetrack.

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But now, with every disused circuit and airfield in the country opening for track days, it’s easy to spend more time on the track than your Grand Prix heroes, especially if they’re driving for Jaguar.

The phenomenal growth of track days has also spawned a new breed of cars. Over the past few months we have featured the Westfield XTR2, Radical SR3, Leading Edge 240RT and Vemac RD190. Good toys, lots of them. Designed for maximum action on the circuit – and minimum use on the road.

And now here’s another one – the Automotive Solutions AS One. In fact, it’s a bit unfair. The ONE is not just another racing car. The attention to detail in the design and construction of this car is amazing. This is the very first prototype, but the finish is superb. Each component was designed in 3D on a computer, the tubular structure was laser cut, the carbon fiber body moldings were CNC machined, all techniques used by major car manufacturers.

Unlike the other track day specials mentioned, the One will be fully homologated and crash tested, and it will come with a two-year warranty. What makes this all the more remarkable is that it was made by just two men – German Felix Feuerbach and Briton Jeremy Vick, who built this prototype himself by hand. OK so they had a little help from Opel here and there, and were able to pull some strings on the place with the help of a former BMW board member, but otherwise it was just Felix and Jeremy.

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The plan is to start production in the summer of 2003, when the One will cost around £30,000. So what, apart from a nice finish and lots of computer-aided design, do you get for one and a half times the price of a Westfield XTR2?

The principle is substantially the same. Beneath the sharply styled open two-seater body is the engine of a Suzuki Hyabusa motorcycle. It is mid-mounted and drives the rear wheels via a smart differential designed by racing specialists Quaife. The motorcycle’s six-speed sequential gearbox is retained and, in the One, is operated by paddles on the steering wheel, although currently the clutch pedal is used conventionally.

The chassis is a tubular spaceframe, the suspension is fully adjustable, the underside of the car is flat, incorporating a venturi and diffuser to keep the car grounded at high speeds without the need for a large wing. Other neat touches include a detachable steering wheel and a multi-function Stack instrument display.

The seats are custom race numbers with weatherproof leather upholstery, full race harnesses, and even removable seat cushions so you don’t mark them when getting in and out of the car (because it doesn’t have no doors).

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The Suzuki engine produces 235 hp, and the weight of the production cars will be about 600 kg. Performance claims are 0-60mph in four seconds and a top end of 150mph – aided by a long sixth gear not fitted to this prototype.

Just getting in and starting the One is an event. With lots of practice a very cool Bo and Luke Duke style jump could be done, but the first few times it’s all about lifting one leg high out to the side and sort of falling. on) the driving position is superb and this car hasn’t even been tuned for me. The pedals and steering wheel can be adjusted from the factory to suit the owner exactly.

To start the engine, I turn a key, flip an off-center, airplane-style latch, then press a rocker. The Hyabusa engine screams instantly at 4,000 rpm. Amazingly, the One will come out of the idle line and that seems like the best way to start. I briefly switch to second before applying full power. Once the Hyabusa engine hits 6,000 rpm, the One really gets going. In final production models, full throttle shifts will be possible, but today I have to back up between gears, after which a pool of flames explodes from the exhaust in proper Batmobile fashion.

The gear selector takes some getting used to and I miss the occasional change but the car was hastily prepped for the Top Gear TV boys and I’m willing to forgive Felix and Jeremy for that little glitch because the rest of the car feels so right and I doubt I got around the Top Gear test track much faster. There’s no doubt that the AS One is as enjoyable a ride as it gets.

I wear a full-face helmet, but there’s little jolt, suggesting the One could be ridden on the road without a cover. It’s also been designed with more ground clearance than its rivals to make it more road-friendly, while the suspension isn’t too firm even when rigged up for track use. A tonneau cover will be offered, although there are no plans for a roof or windows.

The One isn’t the cheapest track special, but it’s much more road-friendly than a Westfield or Radical. And even the prototype is put together better than those two.

Please excuse the horrible pun, but I really want one.

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MO Church: 1997 Honda Magna 750 https://motostays.com/mo-church-1997-honda-magna-750/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 16:08:24 +0000 https://motostays.com/mo-church-1997-honda-magna-750/ Once upon a time, Honda’s mighty V-fours ruled the road. Now they don’t even make them anymore. In the case of the latest Magna 750, that might not be such a bad thing. Maybe take a look at a Rebel 1100 DCT instead? Take it away, old Billy Baroo. Supposedly, there are only two types […]]]>

Once upon a time, Honda’s mighty V-fours ruled the road. Now they don’t even make them anymore. In the case of the latest Magna 750, that might not be such a bad thing. Maybe take a look at a Rebel 1100 DCT instead? Take it away, old Billy Baroo.

Supposedly, there are only two types of motorcyclists – those who like to ride comfortably and those who like to take quick, steady trips to the chiropractor. However, Honda realized long ago (1981 in fact), that there were a select few who wanted to relax in comfort. and rip the asphalt. For these hybrid riders, Honda created the V45 Magna and, a year later, the V65 Magna. Long and low, the Magna impresses with its 28-inch seat height.

The V65 went the way of the dodo bird a few years later, as reliability issues arose with its larger 1100cc engine (V65 refers to cubic inches). The V45 remains; however, his amenities have changed over the years.

Today’s Magna shares the “power cruiser” designation alongside Yamaha’s V-Max and Harley-Davidson’s XL1200S Sportster Sport, though, with its sportbike V-4 engine lodged in a frame designed for cruising, it has more in common with Kawasaki’s Eliminator. Motorcycle styles have passed, as have Magna’s. In the 80s, his look was characterized by a high and narrow profile. In the fashion-conscious ’90s, the Magna underwent a complete makeover, first with upswept pipes and a bikini fairing, and now with its long, low apparel.

“However, a word to the wise: don’t be fooled. It’s not a cruiser.The four-into-four exhaust is cool, the drum brakes are not. Today, the Magna shares its four-cylinder engine with the VFR750F, a motorcycle long honored by motojournalists (yes, us too) as the most liveable sportbike ever made. Equally hailed by motorcycle press around the world as the best cruiser in the world, the Magna raised our expectations. We salivated at the thought of long sunset rides, with its new pipes and cam synchronization for even more torque and a cool, relaxed feel.

When we took the Magna out for a 300 mile trip, we were disappointed for several reasons. First, its plush seat, while good for short city jaunts, took its toll on the posterior as your butt sank into oblivion. Second, the bars have been positioned at exactly the right angle to catch every molecule of air heading towards the rider. The massive rectangular radiator sticks out like a sore thumb on the otherwise pretty front end.

Unless you have a steel grip, speeds over 85 mph are nearly impossible, and cruising over 75 mph is very uncomfortable. We suggest you buy the $132 bikini fairing from Honda-line.

Then, just as your shoulders begin to separate and your derriere is eaten up by the seat, the engine begins to lose power and bog down. Damn, we were almost out of gas. After only about 110 miles on the road (85 in the city), it’s time to fuel up.

On a more positive note, we liked the close-ratio gearbox, it’s strong and smooth, but ill-suited for a cruiser. It has high and top gears that spin you around five to six times on the highway.

“We saw the engine’s full potential as it moved past the buzzing 7-8 range and into motorcycle nirvana.”

Our next jaunts on the Mag’ were city commutes and boulevard cruises. Here, the tall, wide bars and plush seat are comfortable, but we discovered some new concerns.

While not apparent on the highway, around town we did experience mid-throttle carb issues. When cruising between 4000 and 5000 rpm, the Magna has a tendency to lean, and pushing through that we felt a wide flat spot that lasts through 7000 rpm (see dyno diagrams). However, at that time you probably feel sorry for the poor engine and you will want to shift gears soon.

The answer (obviously enough) is to drag the engine low, but that only leaves you with about 25 horsepower to work with.

After its inauspicious debut, things didn’t look bright for the V-four. Fortunately, one day we got bored sitting around the office and went for a ride in the canyons. There we found Magna’s house. Hanging out with the relative slugs of our midweight cruiser test, the Magna dusted them off. Its firm, supple suspension soaked up the bumps and kept its composure through the turns.

The flat spot was still present, but tilt thrust was not an issue with the constant throttle roll and ever-changing revs. The varied and aggressive environment of the twisties also gave us a chance to open the throttle and scream, and we finally saw the engine’s full potential as it moved past the buzzy 7-8 range and into nirvana. of motorcycle.

Please email Flames about the helmet here. Are we saying the Magna is actually a sports car in disguise? Not exactly. Don’t try to hang out with Ducatis and GSX-R750 in your local thrash zone, because unless they’re ridden by total squids, you’ll end up dusted or dead.

And while the ground clearance is plenty for spirited cruising through tight stuff, at full sport pace, you’ll scratch parts of the bike or parts of your body at the bottom of a ravine.

So, having glimpsed the potential of this bike, we’d like to offer a few suggestions for turning this slightly flawed bike into a truly awesome bike. A few suggestions for the Magna we recently tested: A different cam for more low end. Clean the carburetion. Lose the plastic. Clean components, radiator. Put a good place in the ACE 750.

Characteristics:
Manufacturer: Honda Model: 1997 VF750C Magna Price: $7,499 Engine: DOHC 90 degree V-4 valve Bore x stroke: 70mm x 48.6mm Displacement: 748cc Carburetor: four 34mm CV Transmission: 5-speed Wheelbase: 65.0 in. Seat height: 28.0 in. Fuel capacity: 3.6 gal.

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My Royal Enfield Interceptor 650: 3 years & 22,500 km update https://motostays.com/my-royal-enfield-interceptor-650-3-years-22500-km-update/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 05:47:00 +0000 https://motostays.com/my-royal-enfield-interceptor-650-3-years-22500-km-update/ It’s been 3,300 km on the 17-inch wheels and the setup works perfectly well. There is no sign of oscillation at any speed. BHPian Torino recently shared this with other enthusiasts. The Silver Blitz 650 is now 3 years old with 22,500 km at the ODO. Good Timeless and clean retro looks. Refined engine with […]]]>

It’s been 3,300 km on the 17-inch wheels and the setup works perfectly well. There is no sign of oscillation at any speed.

BHPian Torino recently shared this with other enthusiasts.

The Silver Blitz 650 is now 3 years old with 22,500 km at the ODO.

Good

  • Timeless and clean retro looks.
  • Refined engine with a sweet exhaust growl that delivers usable power and torque around town and on the highway.
  • Endless list of spare parts and accessories.
  • The 17-inch wheel conversion and suspension lowering kit made it much easier for me to handle the bike in traffic and the parking lot.
  • Reasonably reliable for an RE with excellent customer service and after sales service.

The bad

  • Low Electricity: The fuel level indicator goes crazy for a few minutes after each water wash. The neutral light stays on in all gears when riding in heavy rain.
  • Quality Issues: Poor quality fuel cap rubber gasket, worn ignition/lock assembly.
  • Difficult to maintain the luster of the crankcase.
  • Continuous need to purchase more replacement parts and accessories.
  • Isn’t this a perfect motorcycle out of the box.

Changes made

The last 3.5 years have been quite a journey for me, from being a non-Royal Enfield to booking the Interceptor 650 on launch day and delivering initial batches to initial concerns about intrusive footpegs , the uncomfortable seat and the weight to slowly get used to the bike and make modifications to suit my needs as the bike remains extremely reliable all the time for an RE. This Royal Enfield won me over with its charm and character. The original 3 year warranty ends today and I didn’t take the extended warranty hoping I wouldn’t need it, that’s a gamble I decided to take. Aside from the broken lock and broken fuel cap rubber seal which were replaced under warranty, the Interceptor has remained reliable without breaking down or having a seizure over the last 3 years of ownership. Additionally, there are no reports of any lingering issues with the 650 twins.

17 inch wheel installation and suspension lowering kit

It’s been 3,300 km on the 17-inch wheels and the setup works perfectly fine. Those 3,300 km were a mix of fast highway trips and local trips over all sorts of terrain and road conditions. More importantly, there is no sign of wobbling at any speed. The Ceat XL Zoom and Apollo Alpha S1 tires do a good job of providing decent levels of grip and durability, haven’t encountered any punctures so far. As for the suspension lowering kit, it is a great product on its own for smaller riders. I use the 17-inch wheels with the rear suspension lowering kit and set the suspension preload to its hardest level to get the right balance between ride height and ground clearance.

New battery

The factory fitted Exide battery lasted exactly 3 years. The battery started showing signs of weakness last month and the engine only ignited on the second attempt to press the start button. I visited the RE OMR service center last week to change the fuel cap/lockout assembly under warranty and the bike refused to start at the service center and they tried charging the battery for 4 hours but to no avail . The original battery specification is 12V 12Ah, but the availability of this factory spec battery is almost non-existent. The RE service advisor suggested going for a 12V 14Ah battery which is compatible and readily available in the market. I checked with my friend who deals with batteries and electric power and he said the 14Ah battery won’t cause any problems except for longer charging time which will be insignificant. Got an Exide FXL0-XLTX14 12V 14Ah battery for Rs2800 after swapping the old battery for Rs300. The new Exide battery comes with a 2-year replacement warranty and an additional 2-year pro-rated warranty.

I chose Exide over the popular Amaron due to my past experience on multiple vehicles.

The battery change took 10 minutes. Only the tools in the toolbox do the job.

The entire lock was changed under warranty during the last week of the warranty period.

3M PPF after 3 years of service. Time to change. PPF did a great job considering the types of objects I placed on the tank. Shopping bags, tools, babies with anklets and the usual tank bag to name a few.

The Apollo Alpha S1 140/60R17 is tough enough for our roads. The reason I chose S1 over H1.

Ceat Zoom XL in the front.

The usual suspects.

The side panel leather bag contains the helmet padlock and sanitizer.

The 17-inch wheels are hard to spot.

I love the clean and timeless design.

If that’s not the best thing about the bike, the exhaust note ever!

Check out BHPian’s comments for more ideas and information.

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Yezdi Adventure vs Royal Enfield Himalayan – Comparative review: Hit or Miss? https://motostays.com/yezdi-adventure-vs-royal-enfield-himalayan-comparative-review-hit-or-miss/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 06:36:50 +0000 https://motostays.com/yezdi-adventure-vs-royal-enfield-himalayan-comparative-review-hit-or-miss/ Think of Indian adventure motorcycles, and the Royal Enfield Himalayan is probably the first motorcycle that comes to mind. After various minor but necessary updates over the past six years, the Himalayan formula is now reliable and proven. So much so that it appears resurgent brand Yezdi has ‘referenced’ its first adventure offering, subtly called […]]]>

Think of Indian adventure motorcycles, and the Royal Enfield Himalayan is probably the first motorcycle that comes to mind. After various minor but necessary updates over the past six years, the Himalayan formula is now reliable and proven. So much so that it appears resurgent brand Yezdi has ‘referenced’ its first adventure offering, subtly called the Adventure, to the Himalayas.

The design similarities between the two are quite obvious. What is different, however, is the heart of the Yezdi, a sophisticated liquid-cooled engine with more claimed performance on tap. So we can’t wait to find out what other secret ingredients Yezdi added to the adventure to make it a better Himalayan?

Lighter + more powerful = faster!

Characteristics Yezdi Adventure RE Himalayan
Motor Liquid-cooled 334cc single cylinder 411cc air/oil cooled single cylinder
To be able to 30.2PS @ 8000rpm 24.3PS @ 6500rpm
Couple 29.9 Nm at 6,500 rpm 32Nm @ 4000 – 4500rpm
Gearbox 6 speeds 5 speeds

As mentioned, the Yezdi Adventure engine is modern and technologically advanced, with a 6-speed gearbox associated with it. It weighs less too, 11 kilos in all. So a lighter bike is faster, right?

Acceleration Yezdi Adventure RE Himalayan
0-60km/h 3.86s 4.43s
0-80km/h 6.41s 7.20s
0-100km/h 10.20s 11.49s
30-70 km/h in 3rd gear 4.85s 5.29s
40-80 km/h in 4th gear 6.17s 7.10s

Yes, the Yezdi manages to outrun the Himalayas in the 0-100 km/h sprint by more than a second. It also reaches speeds over 130 km/h much faster and easier than the Enfield. The Yezdi also feels livelier in lower gears, thanks to the extra gear ratio.

However, these numbers are purely for academic reasons. In the real world, the Yezdi doesn’t actually help you reach your destination any sooner than the Himalayas. Added performance cannot be used for extended durations due to low refinement levels. When you open the gas and rev the engine to your liking, you get harsh, persistent vibrations at the ankles, seat and, most importantly, the tank.

This harshness forces you to settle down to a lower speed of around 100 km/h, where the Himalayas feel more relaxed. First of all, it runs more quietly, with the engine revving about a thousand rpm slower than the Yezdi. Although it sounds a little garish, it also feels softer.

Plus, the Himalaya makes every trip effortless, thanks to its high-torque 411cc engine. When you slow down for a slow vehicle on the highway, all it takes is a twist of the throttle to pick up speed. The Yezdi makes you work a bit, as it isn’t as eager to regain lost momentum, forcing you to downshift a cog or two. In fact, we even tested 60-60 mph acceleration in the top gear of both bikes, and the Himalayan took 11.16 seconds to complete the race, a second quicker than the Yezdi.

The ease of the Himalayas is also found in the city, as you can just leave it at a higher gear and ride at commuting speeds, which seems impossible to do on the Yezdi. The benefit of brilliant handling will be much appreciated by commuters as the Himalayan’s clutch is heavier. That said, shifting was a little smoother on the RE.

Yezdi Adventure RE Himalayan
Energy efficiency in the city 33.07kmpl 32.04kmpl
Motorway energy efficiency 35.16kmpl 39.96kmpl
Tank capacity 15.5 liters 15 liters

Now both motorcycles can carry almost the same amount of fuel on board. But it’s the Himalayan’s torquey motor and high gearing that make it a very efficient motor for highway use.

Take everything Indian Roads has to offer

Before we get into the design similarities, we should mention that both bikes have the same wheelbase, ground clearance, suspension travel and wheel sizes. But after riding both, it feels like only one of them is capable of taking on anything an Indian road can throw at a rider, and unfortunately that isn’t the Yezdi.

This is because of two issues, both of which relate to suspension tuning. First, the rider never feels installed on the bike. Even on smooth sections of tarmac, at 50-55 km/h you get that constant rocking feeling. As a result, when negotiating steep bumps on the highway or big speed bumps in town, the extra monoshock tends to knock the rider out of the seat, upsetting the bike’s rhythm.

What’s more pressing is that the front end doesn’t quite soak up the bumps to your liking. It stands in stark contrast to the Himalayan, whose suspension has been calibrated to absorb uneven surfaces brilliantly. This lets the rider pass much less, which means you sit calmer, unlike the taut Yezdi setup.

Not to be confused, the Yezdi doesn’t feel jarring or harsh like the “sporty” KTM 250/390 Adventures, but it isn’t as masterful at tackling broken sections of tarmac.

This tight configuration has its advantages in the corners; adventure provides a calmer and safer experience. It feels lighter to steer and more balanced when leaning over, and the extra-wide rear tire has to be credited for the latter.

Braking Yezdi Adventure RE Himalayan
100-0km/h 50.40m 54.46m
80-0km/h 31.95m 35.13m
60-0km/h 18.67m 20.13m

And the one area where the Royal Enfield Himalayan continues to disappoint is its braking service. The bike has been on sale for over six years, but RE still hasn’t really improved its stopping performance.

Braking on the Yezdi feels like that of a modern adventure bike, with a fair amount of bite and lever progression. It does not require much effort from the levers to immobilize the bike. In addition, the ABS calibration is perfectly executed.

When things get tough

When you’re in the adventure touring market, you’re bound to be interested in the bike’s off-tarmac riding capabilities. And this is where the Royal Enfield Himalayan feels right at home. It puts the rider at ease, with its supple, foldable suspension setup and easy, accessible ergonomics. Our test bike ran with the wider handlebars in the RE GMA catalog, and we think it’s a must-have for all Himalayan buyers because it not only reduces fatigue on long rides, but also improves your control over the terrain. difficult.

The Yezdi demands more from the rider as one cannot properly lock onto the bike due to its design. More importantly, the Adventure’s taller footpegs would force you to take a fraction longer to get your feet on the ground, and for shorter riders who just want to buffer and ride away, that extra moment could make all the difference.

The Himalayas still tips the scales in its favor with the abundance of torque available at low revs. New riders don’t need to worry too much about being in the right gear all the time, allowing the engine to handle the tricky situation. That’s not quite possible on the fancier liquid-cooled Yezdi because you have to dial in more revs or you’ll end up stalling the bike if you’re not in the right gear.

Ramesh Suresh?

Yezdi seems to have taken the stalwart, industrial design language of the Himalayas and augmented it with iconic elements like the square tank and rectangular engine case of yesteryear. However, the Parsee bawa in me would have liked to see more of these items currently hidden behind pipes and metal guards.

While some of you may find the neat design of the tail with its small round lighting elements interesting, I didn’t find it very appealing. Frankly, I thought it was incomplete, really.

The USB charging hub is what I appreciate about the Yezdi, although its assembly could have been better executed. You get both a Type-A charging socket and a Type-C charging socket as standard.

The Yezdi has a kind of solid, geeky dash to it. To be honest, that’s not a good use of the available square footage. There’s a large digital dial on the left (displaying your usual driving-related data) and a smaller dial for the turn-by-turn navigation system. We couldn’t test how it works because it was a customer’s bike, and Yezdi’s smartphone app is locked to a single phone number. So if your friend lends you their adventure, you technically won’t be able to use the help on your phone.

Himalaya has many dials, indicator signs and buttons. And to top it off, the placement of the new Tripper pod certainly feels like an afterthought. Reading speed and rpm isn’t much of an issue, but other data displayed on the small digital inset can be tricky to read on the fly. Fortunately, the Tripper works perfectly.

As far as build quality goes, the Himalayan is sturdy but isn’t smooth. Unfortunately, the construction and finish of the Yezdi is very sticky. The tank cage, which is a mandatory accessory that the company requires its buyers to purchase upon delivery for Rs 5,000, was misaligned, as was the grab handle. The scariest part was that the few bolts that helped secure the front disc to the wheel kept coming loose. The seat bracket was still missing, as was the front license plate bracket.

Missed opportunity

So, did Yezdi really make a better Himalayan? No Unfortunately. Because the promise made by Yezdi has not been fulfilled in the real world. Take the engine, for example. In isolation, he does a pretty decent job. However, for all its sophistication and advancements, it still cannot match the humble Himalayan air/oil cooled grinder when it comes to everyday maneuverability and ease of use in all riding scenarios.

More importantly, a good suspension setup is essential for an adventure rider. The Yezdi, again, feels well equipped but is no match for the Himalayas, which allow the rider to relax more often and for longer on various surfaces.

And it was here that Yezdi missed a golden opportunity. The Himalayan, as we know, is at the end of its life cycle, and it will be replaced by something meatier and more useful. But it seems that is still a long way off.

So if you are looking for adventure, the Yezdi might not be your best bet.

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Ducati Streetfighter V4 S: Certainly not lean, but surely a mean machine https://motostays.com/ducati-streetfighter-v4-s-certainly-not-lean-but-surely-a-mean-machine/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 10:38:09 +0000 https://motostays.com/ducati-streetfighter-v4-s-certainly-not-lean-but-surely-a-mean-machine/ Power-boosted, after a point you’ll find yourself leaning over the handlebars to not only combat wind speed, but the feeling of being left behind by the bike At 208hp, it’s the most powerful production naked bike in the world (tied with the MV Agusta Brutale 1000RR), and it offers a power-to-weight ratio of over 1,000hp/tonne. […]]]>

Power-boosted, after a point you’ll find yourself leaning over the handlebars to not only combat wind speed, but the feeling of being left behind by the bike

At 208hp, it’s the most powerful production naked bike in the world (tied with the MV Agusta Brutale 1000RR), and it offers a power-to-weight ratio of over 1,000hp/tonne. That, without wind protection and the extra steering lever of a wide handlebar… Good God!

It’s also not like the Ducati Streetfighter V4 S looks like a sweet, approachable thing. We’re riding the higher-performance Model S, which comes in this medium shade of matte black called Dark Stealth. With those big biplane wings sticking out the side, the Streetfighter looks badass, and not in the neo-cool way the word is now getting around on social media. He’s the motorcyclist’s version of a heavyweight MMA fighter that will beat your living pulp if you look at him in a fun way. The bike arrived the day before our first day of shooting and I remember the few hours of sleep that followed weren’t exactly the most peaceful out of sheer excitement.

Previous experience with this motor in the Panigale encouraged me to get the bike out of my company well early the next morning before firing it up. It was possible that the now Euro 5/BS6 compliant engine would be a bit quieter, but no. Push the start button and the 1,103cc V4 explodes into life before settling into one of the loudest idles I’ve heard on an emissions-compliant motorcycle.

Ducati Streetfighter V4 S: Certainly not lean, but surely a mean machine

As the engine warmed up, a minute or two was spent scrolling through the easily navigable menus on the TFT screen, looking for the smoothest of the three drive modes. With the bike in Street mode, we set off timidly.

Ten minutes down the familiar city road, I found myself thinking, ‘Wait a minute, that’s really docile!’ With maximum power limited to 155hp in the lowest of three power modes, the Streetfighter is even smoother than the smaller Panigale V2, which produces the same amount of power. That’s probably because the SF’s 155hp in this mode comes in much higher revs than the V2, but nonetheless, 10 minutes later I was ready for the full 208hp.

Switching to Sport mode brings a radical change. You now have full power with not only much more responsive throttle responses, but the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 electronically controlled suspension firming up a fair amount as well. But surprise, surprise, the bike is still quite usable, although you now have to be a lot more careful with your inputs. Eventually some open roads present themselves and it’s time to find out what 208 hp looks like on a naked bike.

Ducati Streetfighter V4 S: Certainly not lean, but surely a mean machine

By the time you cross 8000rpm things start to get really fast and you have to lean over the handlebars not only to fight the wind but also because you feel like the bike is trying to get you leaving behind. Then you realize you still have nearly half the rev range left… Screaming past 10,000 rpm and finally 14,500 rpm is a scary experience, but reaffirming the life, which will put anything short of a hypercar to shame.

It’s just unreal how fast this bike can be, but what’s amazing is how Ducati has made this literal bomb of a motor… usable. You’d expect it to be a demonic rolling machine, but somehow it hooks up and kicks from second gear. Ducati has achieved this by limiting torque in the first four gears, equipping this latest-generation bike with eight-stage wheel control and also extending the wheelbase by 19mm compared to the Panigale. Surely those fenders have to do some work too – Ducati claims 27kg of weight on the front wheel at 270km/h. And finally, this engine has a counter-rotating crankshaft which also helps in this regard.

The engine is also incredibly smooth for a Ducati. It’s still not turbine-smooth at low revs, like an inline-four, but it’s way better than any Ducati V-twin and you can actually get down to 50kph in sixth gear.

Add to that the driving position, which remains very sporty but has nothing to do with the brutal Panigale, and you have something easier to live with on our roads. Of course, this is still a very capable, extremely capable machine, so there are tradeoffs you’ll have to live with.

First of all, the 845mm saddle height is even taller than the Panigale because this bike has a more padded and comfortable seat for what the bike is. Then there’s the heavy clutch which is also quite snappy at city speeds. The awful superbike-style turning radius is also a pain, but more importantly, there’s still a lot of heat to deal with.

The Streetfighter runs very hot at all times, even if there is no traffic around. The engine features clever cylinder deactivation technology that shuts off the rear bank of cylinders at idle, but things can still get very hot if you’re stuck in a heavy traffic jam. That being said, like most Ducatis, its cooling system does a great job of managing heat, and the challenge is basically whether the rider can handle it.

It also craves high-octane fuel, and if you drive it hard enough, efficiency can drop into the single digits. At this point you realize the bike has no fuel gauge and all you get is a low fuel warning light. We found it to run perfectly on 100 octane fuel, which costs around ₹160 per litre. Fun.

Again, it’s a similar if not worse story with the Panigale, and as with that bike, you put up with that hassle for the amazing way it rides. This bike uses the same front frame chassis as the Panigale V4 and since we have the S model here it gets the same electronically controlled suspension.

Ducati Streetfighter V4 S: Certainly not lean, but surely a mean machine

The suspension does an amazing job of being sporty, but never overly stiff or harsh in any drive mode. When it comes to bad roads, you have to be careful of course, both with the rims and with the low ground clearance of 121 mm. But with a cautious approach, the Streetfighter took us through the usual speed breakers and rough roads that are so generously spread all around.

On the occasion that you find smooth, twisty tarmac, the handling feels very serious and top-notch. Directional changes aren’t very crisp, but the level of front-end feel and control is exactly what you’d expect from a top-level superbike and the Streetfighter rails through the corners with incredible confidence. Like the Panigale, the Streetfighter’s handling talents feel way above what you can exploit on the road and there’s no overwhelming feeling that you’re not even scratching the surface of what this bike can do. .

That being said, it’s a pleasant ride on the street, thanks to the added comfort. Even though this bike gets Pirelli Rosso Corsa 2 tires against Panigale’s Supercorsas, those tires are incredibly grippy and full of feel. Luckily the Brembo Stylema brakes are exactly what you get on the faired bike and are pretty much the best brakes I’ve experienced.

It’s a similar story with the massive electronics package that comes straight from the Panigale, including the TFT display. Ride modes, power modes, launch control, engine brake control, slip control, traction control, this bike has it all, and honestly, it’s these incredible electronics that allow even such mental bikes to thrive. exist in the first place.

Naturally, with its insane performance, cutting-edge technology and pure Italian exoticism, this bike comes at a pretty hefty price tag. The standard Streetfighter V4 costs ₹20 lakh (ex-showroom), while you have to shell out ₹3 lakh more for the V4 S you see here. The extra cash gets you Öhlins electronic steering suspension and damper, lighter forged aluminum wheels and the exclusive Stealth Black paint. Sure, it’s a lot of money, but it’s a lot of motorcycling.

What impressed me the most was the fact that this bike didn’t try to kill me. What I thought was scary actually turned out to be fun and satisfying, even when you’re not chasing the stratospheric red line. This bike lets you get the full Panigale experience on the road, without most of the pain. And that’s an amazing feat.

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10 things every motorcycle enthusiast should know about the 2022 Yamaha Tenere 700 https://motostays.com/10-things-every-motorcycle-enthusiast-should-know-about-the-2022-yamaha-tenere-700/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://motostays.com/10-things-every-motorcycle-enthusiast-should-know-about-the-2022-yamaha-tenere-700/ The Yamaha Tenere 700 is one of the most economical mid-weight adventure touring motorcycles. Since the motorcycle entered the US market in 2019, it has also been one of the best-selling motorcycles in the segment. This can be attributed to the solid reliability, excellent powertrain and impressive on-road and off-road driving experience it offers. With […]]]>

The Yamaha Tenere 700 is one of the most economical mid-weight adventure touring motorcycles. Since the motorcycle entered the US market in 2019, it has also been one of the best-selling motorcycles in the segment. This can be attributed to the solid reliability, excellent powertrain and impressive on-road and off-road driving experience it offers.

With the arrival of the 2022 Yamaha Tenere 700, now available for sale at a starting MSRP of $ 10,299, Yamaha has retained all of the qualities of the outgoing 2021 model, without any major changes being implemented. The sleek and refined parallel twin engine helps the bike tackle any terrain with ease, and the decent suspension and chassis further complement it. Competing with the tastes of the KTM Duke 790 Adventure and the BMW F800 GS, here are 10 things every enthusiast should know about the Tenere 700.

RELATED: 10 Things Every Motorcycle Enthusiast Should Know About the Yamaha R7 2022

ten Parallel-twin motor is perfect for an adventure tourer


2022 Yamaha Ténéré 700
Via Google / MotoNews World

The 2022 Yamaha Tenere 700 gets the same 689cc Liquid-Cooled DOHC Parallel Twin Engine like the Yamaha MT-07 and the Yamaha R7. This means the bike produces 63.7 hp and 44 lb-ft of torque, which is about the same as the others in the Yamaha team. This engine is mated to a 6-speed manual gearbox and refueling is done using electronic fuel injection with 48mm throttle bodies.


2022 Yamaha XSR700 engine close-up view
Via: Yamahamotorsports.com

The power output is impressive and the engine propels the Tenere 700 forward with just a slight twist of the throttle. The engine is quite punchy at low to mid-range, making it a great proposition for highway journeys as well as off-road. Driving around town is easy, and that can be paired with precise refueling. The on-off transitions are also perfect.


9 Neat and well-arranged gears make it capable anywhere


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It has a typical 6-speed manual gearbox that you typically see in most Yamaha motorcycles, and there is nothing wrong with the precision and shifting feel of this gearbox. All the gears snap into place with precision and there are none of those false neutral issues you might find in the KTM Duke 790 Adventure.


yamaha tenere 700
via Yamaha

Another positive aspect of this gearbox is the neatly arranged gears. The initial gears (first and second) are neither too high nor too short, which makes it very easy to drive in dangerous off-road sections as well as in cities. With the fifth and sixth gears high, the Tenere 700 is also able to go on highways with very low engine hardness and vibration, as the engine is at a reasonably low RPM.

RELATED: 10 Things Every Motorcycle Enthusiast Should Know About the Yamaha MT-07 2022

8 Energy efficiency is a defined USP


2021-yamaha-tenere-700
Via: Yamaha

Since the CP2 engine is quite synonymous with excellent fuel efficiency, especially in the MT-07 and R7, the same philosophy is also applied to the Tenere 700. The 2022 Yamaha Tenere 700 is capable of yielding close to 50 mpg of combined gas mileage, which is quite respectable for the adventure travel segment.


Person riding a Yamaha Tenere 700 parked in the desert
via IAMABIKER

With a sizable 4.2 gallon fuel tank capacity, the 2022 Tenere 700 also has the capacity to deliver 212 miles of tank range. You can also get better gas mileage and tank range if you increase the throttle and upshift faster. The bike could reach highway speeds at very low revs in sixth gear, which would further increase mileage.


seven Impressive driving manners on the road


Yamaha Tenere 700 Raid Prototypes catching the air wallpaper
Via: Yamaha-motor.eu

While the 2022 Yamaha Tenere 700 doesn’t look like a motorcycle comfortable enough for the roads, that isn’t quite true. With a soft suspension setup for the front and rear, which is tuned to the softer side, the Tenere 700 could easily achieve the status of the segment’s most comfortable middleweight tourer at low speed around town.


Blue Yamaha Tenere 700, side view
via Upshift online

With an adequate seat height of 34.4 “coupled with excellent ride ergonomics and legroom on offer, the on-road riding experience was felt to be far superior to its rivals. However, the configuration of the the soft suspension makes the driving experience slightly mediocre on the speed highway, as the bike feels a bit unstable.

RELATED: 10 Things Every Motorcycle Enthusiast Should Know About the Yamaha MT-09 SP 2022

6 Offroad is where it shines


Person riding Yamaha Tenere 700 in the desert
via Yamaha Motorsports

The torquey engine and reasonably short, well-matched first and second gears help bring out the best in the Tenere 700 in off-roading. As a result, he could easily get out of dangerous conditions like slush and sand. The flexible suspension system is another advantage of the Tenere 700, which is very useful off-road.


The new Yamaha Tenere 700
Via Google / Asphalt and rubber

The front comes with a Kayaba USD 43mm fork and the rear features a Kayaba monoshock with spring preload and rebound adjustment. Due to the smooth setup the bike turns quite smoothly and the impressive low-end torque helps it get out of any tough off-road situations. Direction changes are also quite easy which can be attributed to the double cradle steel tube chassis and low wet weight of 452 lbs.


5 Build quality is acceptable for the price


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While the build quality of the Yamaha Tenere 700 2022 isn’t going to blow anyone up anyway, it’s far better than most of the brand’s older models, which were sold for a similar price. The handlebars, mirrors, switchgear and other contact points are well assembled and would easily withstand abuse to the motorcycle.


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Even the paint quality of the Tenere 700 is similar to that of many European offerings in the segment. It also turned out to be slightly better than the Duke 790 Adventure. However, one area where Yamaha could have done better is that of exposed screws. There is also a lot of exposed wiring, similar to the MT-07.


4 Reliability is probably the best in the segment


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Even though the older Yamaha Tenere ES had quite a few major engine, gearbox, and electrical related issues and recalls, the Yamaha Tenere 700 was a fairly bulletproof motorcycle. Most of the owners also didn’t have any major complaints with the bike, as can be seen on the Tenere Forum 700.


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With regular oil, changes, filter changes and valve clearance checks, the 2022 Yamaha Tenere 700 has the ability to travel 100,000 miles without major issues. However, some owners have reported that the rubber coating around the wire harness has a tendency to crack, especially at high temperatures. It could also lead to electric gremlins. Apart from that, rattling and squealing has also been reported on the body panels.

RELATED: Here’s How the Ducati DesertX 2022 Compares to the Yamaha Tenere 700

3 The digital display leaves a lot to be desired


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The multifunction LCD display comes standard with the 2022 Yamaha Tenere 700, and it displays all the relevant information a rider would need. The trip, odometer, tachometer, speed, fuel gauge and other information are displayed. It’s also readable in brighter days, and is encased in a plastic case that feels pretty sturdy.


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However, compared to rivals like the KTM Duke 790 Adventure, Kawasaki Versys 650 and BMW F800 GS, the Tenere 700s instrument cluster looks quite outdated. There is no Bluetooth connectivity like the competition. As a result, no browsing, phone calls, messages, etc. cannot be displayed. It is also not a TFT screen.


2 Not the most feature-rich motorcycle


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The 2022 Yamaha Tenere 700 lacks many driver aids and other important features, many of which could be found in other similarly priced motorcycles in the mid-weight adventure touring segment. With the lack of cruise control, traction control and heated grips, it manages to slow down the driving experience.


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The digital instrument cluster leaves a lot to be desired. It lacks all the features offered by Bluetooth technology. The display also gives the impression of being taken from the 90s. Along with that, no driving mode is offered either. However, the LED headlights and taillights and the KYB USD forks up front are decent additions.


1 Stand out from rivals


2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700
Via: Yamaha Motorsports

The design of the 2022 Yamaha Tenere 700 has been carried over from the 2021 model, and that’s not a bad thing. This is one of the coolest motorcycles in the segment, which is mainly due to the striking LED headlight, massive ground clearance and blacked-out elements.


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The front part looks a bit odd and that adds to the character. The two-tone schemes (Team Yamaha Blue and Raven) are also exceptional. The side fairings with stickers, the petal disc up front and the massive side exhaust make it very beautiful to look at. The rear of the Tenere 700 looks like a real Dakar rally motorcycle due to the shortened tail, orange indicators and 150 section Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires.


Yamaha Tenere 700 2021: costs, facts and figures

Yamaha sort of strikes a perfect balance, and instead of creating something warm enough like most people expected

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Ducati’s Dual-Sport DesertX motorcycle is designed for the dunes https://motostays.com/ducatis-dual-sport-desertx-motorcycle-is-designed-for-the-dunes/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 17:30:00 +0000 https://motostays.com/ducatis-dual-sport-desertx-motorcycle-is-designed-for-the-dunes/ [ad_1] Ducati test riders take the DesertX off the steep sand dunes. Ducati Italian motorcycle manufacturer Ducati has presented a new model better designed for off-road travel and fans of “adventure motorcycles”, also known as “ADV motorcycles” or “dual sport”, could not be. happier. Called Ducati DesertX, the 110 horsepower machine features styling that pays […]]]>


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Italian motorcycle manufacturer Ducati has presented a new model better designed for off-road travel and fans of “adventure motorcycles”, also known as “ADV motorcycles” or “dual sport”, could not be. happier.

Called Ducati DesertX, the 110 horsepower machine features styling that pays homage to Ducati’s desert racing machines of the 1980s while being fully up to street standards and cutting edge in technology and performance.

The DesertX sits nicely between Ducati’s more road-oriented Multistrada (“many roads”) models which can also venture off the curb and Ducati’s Scrambler range of more urban machines which can also get dirty. However, the technology and hardware engineered into the DesertX gives it a clear advantage over both of these model lines when it comes to off-road performance, and gives Ducati a new entry into the now popular ADV motorcycle category.

Sporting a 21-inch front wheel and 18-inch rear roll bar – sizes most commonly found on off-road motorcycles – the DesertX offers generous ground clearance, Kayaba long-travel suspension components and two modes. special driving gear specially designed for off-road driving. Other driving modes include variations for riding in the rain, on the highway or in more sporty environments.

The DesertX will also be available with a long list of available options that more adventurous riders need, including an additional second fuel tank, sturdy aluminum travel cases, crash bars and details like heated grips. and seat options. The bike starts at $ 16,795, but designed for a “round the world” (“RTW”) expedition, the price can easily reach $ 20,000.

Power comes from the robust but updated 110 horsepower liquid-cooled “L-Twin” two-cylinder “L-Twin” engine that powers several other motorcycles in the Ducati range. Riders will get speed, route information and other vital information from a vertical LCD display in the cockpit. Dual LED headlights integrated into the motorcycle body light the way forward.

Ducati posted a lengthy video (below) detailing DesertX’s technology and performance attributes, and also showed the bike shredding Middle Eastern sand dunes with experienced riders and desert racers at the controls. The message: it’s a Ducati that can take you where most motorcycles can’t.

The DesertX was born from a Ducati concept bike unveiled at the EICMA Motorcycle Show in Italy in 2019. The gas tank, headlights and overall styling are strongly reminiscent of the Ducati desert racing bikes of the 1980s. The reaction The industry has been swift, with many cyclists calling for the bike to go into production. During the pandemic, Ducati apparently used the downtime to upgrade the DesertX. Deliveries of the DesertX are expected to begin in summer 2022. A full line of Ducati adventure touring clothing will also be available.

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2022 Ducati DesertX First Look (13 Offroad Adventure Quick Facts) https://motostays.com/2022-ducati-desertx-first-look-13-offroad-adventure-quick-facts/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 00:27:46 +0000 https://motostays.com/2022-ducati-desertx-first-look-13-offroad-adventure-quick-facts/ [ad_1] After a few years of teasing, here it is: the dirtiest Ducati motorcycle since the 450 R / T of 1971. While by no means a pure all-terrain motorcycle, the Ducati DesertX 2022 is heading towards the offroad / rally end of the adventure bike spectrum. Let’s take a closer look at Ducati’s shot […]]]>


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After a few years of teasing, here it is: the dirtiest Ducati motorcycle since the 450 R / T of 1971. While by no means a pure all-terrain motorcycle, the Ducati DesertX 2022 is heading towards the offroad / rally end of the adventure bike spectrum. Let’s take a closer look at Ducati’s shot at the front of the KTM 890 Adventure R.

Ducati DesertX 2022 price

  1. The Testastretta 11 ° engine of the Ducati DesertX 2022 is based on the engine used in the Multistrada V2 and Monster. The 937cc V-twin with desmodromic actuated valves develops 110 horsepower at 9250 rpm and 68 lb-ft of torque at 6500 rpm. Clutch and transmission modifications improved gear changes and saved nearly four pounds. A quickshifter is standard for the six-speed transmission. The 1st and 2nd gears are considerably lower than those of the Multistrada V2, the 3rd to 5th gears being progressively lower. Sixth gear remains an overdrive suitable for touring.
  1. Off-road good faith is ensured by a 21/18 inch wheel set, long-travel suspension, and a curb weight of less than 500 pounds. “It should be noted that the new DesertX features tire sizes unprecedented for a Ducati – 21 inches up front and 18 inches rear,” claims Ducati, but this wheel pairing was used on the R / T. Either way, these are the rim sizes off-road bikers want to see. The aggressive Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tubeless tires are mounted on the metal spoke rims. The fully adjustable KYB suspension provides approximately nine inches of wheel travel at both ends. The fork is a 46mm inverted unit, while the piggyback reservoir damper is cantilevered rather than linkage assisted. The DesertX tips the scales at 492 pounds with the 5.5 gallon fuel tank topped up. An optional 2.1 gallon auxiliary fuel tank mounted near the rear fender greatly expands the DesertX’s range.

Ducati DesertX 2022 first look: off-road motorcycle

  1. The seat height is 34.4 inches and the ergonomics are user-friendly for standing. Ducati says it kept the midsection thin to make it easier for the rider to grip the bike when off-roading and bring the rider’s boots to the ground. The initially flexible suspension keeps the rider closer to the ground, reducing ground clearance by 9.8 inches. An accessory lower seat is available, but this will impact the relative position of the handles and footrests.
  1. Numerous driver assistance modes and options allow riders to tailor the DesertX to their preferences and conditions. There are six driving modes, plus four power modes. For the first time, a Ducati motorcycle has a Rally mode, which goes with Enduro, Sport, Touring, Urban and Wet modes. The four power modes — Full, High, Medium, and Low — adjust throttle response and power output. Adjustable driving aids supported by the IMU include traction control, wheel control, electronic engine brake adjustment and cornering sensitive ABS. The DesertX’s ABS also has three levels with the cornering function, plus Enduro and Rally, which undoes the cornering utility.

Ducati DesertX 2022 mountain bike

  1. Enduro mode is intended to help less experienced off-road riders, while Rally mode is there for the more aggressive riders. Enduro mode reduces power and speeds up electronic aids, while Rally mode unleashes full power and minimizes electronics intrusion.
  1. Brembo manages the braking tasks. A pair of radial-mount Brembo M50 monobloc calipers grip the 320mm disc. The front brake master cylinder is a direct axial pump design and the lever is adjustable. The 265mm rear disc receives a Brembo two-piston floating caliper.

Ducati DesertX 2022 rally bike

  1. The dashboard is inspired by the rally. The five-inch TFT display is mounted vertically for easy reading by standing cyclists. There are two display modes: Standard and Rally. Rally mode is designed for ease of navigation by mimicking the tripmaster display used by rally motorcycles. Unfortunately, GPS is not part of the system. The optional Ducati multimedia system pairs with your smartphone, providing detailed navigation. If you like listening to music or talking on the phone during a rally raid, the DMS will take care of that.
  1. The passenger seat is optimized for comfort, while the rider seat is more performance oriented.

MSRP Ducati DesertX 2022

  1. An optional larger windshield is available for riders more focused on touring than off-roading.
  1. The optional cases allow almost 120 liters of storage.
  1. Ducati Centro Stile took care of the appearance of the DesertX. Terms such as “dakarian style” and “lines of enduro bikes from the 80s” are used. No matter how they got there, the designers came up with a remarkable motorcycle.

First look at the Ducati DesertX 2022

  1. There will be plenty of clothing to match the DesertX, both casual and technical. You can see the off-road equipment in the action photos.
  1. We will have to wait until June to buy a Ducati DesertX 2022. The MSRP is $ 16,795, almost $ 2,600 more than last year’s KTM 890 Adventure R. You can have the DesertX in any color you want, as long as it is Star White Silk.

Ducati 2022 DesertX Specifications

MOTOR

  • Type: Testastretta 11 ° L-twin
  • Displacement: 937cc
  • Bore x stroke: 94 x 67.5 mm
  • Compression ratio: 13.3: 1
  • Maximum power: 110 horsepower at 9,250 rpm
  • Maximum torque: 68 ft / lb @ 6500 rpm
  • Fuel supply: Bosch EFI with two 53mm throttle bodies
  • Transmission: 6 speed
  • Clutch: hydraulically actuated wet multi-disc with assist and slip functions
  • Final drive: Chain

FRAME

  • Frame: tubular steel trellis
  • Front suspension; travel: fully adjustable KYB 46mm inverted fork; 9.1 inch
  • Rear suspension; travel: fully adjustable KYB piggyback tank damper; 8.7 inch
  • Wheels: tubeless aluminum alloy with metal spokes
  • Front wheel: 21 x 2.15
  • Rear wheel: 18 x 4.5
  • Tires: Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR
  • Front tire: 90/90 x 21
  • Rear tire: 150/70 x 18
  • Front brake: 320mm rotors with Brembo M50 monobloc 4-piston radial-mount calipers and axial pump master cylinder
  • Rear brake: 265mm disc with Brembo 2-piston floating caliper
  • ABS: Bosch cornering ABS

DIMENSIONS and CAPACITIES

  • Wheelbase: 63.3 inches
  • Rake: 27.6 degrees
  • Trail: 4.8 inches
  • Seat height: 34.4 inches
  • Ground clearance: 9.8 inches
  • Fuel capacity: 5.5 gallons
  • Curb weight: 492 pounds
  • Color: Star White Silk

Ducati DesertX 2022 Price: $ 16,795 MSRP

Ducati DesertX 2022 photo gallery


Previous article2022 KTM 450 SX-F Factory Edition First Look [10 Fast Facts + 25 Photos]

With 50 years of riding experience, Don Williams is a fan of all kinds of motorcycles. He enjoys sports motorcycles, cruisers, dirt bikes, touring motorcycles, adventure motorcycles, double sport motorcycles and custom rides. Ask Don what his favorite bike is and he’ll say, “Whichever bike I’m on. “

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Ducati DesertX Adventure Bike unveiled https://motostays.com/ducati-desertx-adventure-bike-unveiled/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 17:19:42 +0000 https://motostays.com/ducati-desertx-adventure-bike-unveiled/ [ad_1] The Ducati DesertX made its world debut as an adventure bike inspired by Ducati’s iconic Dakar machines from the 90s. The bike will arrive in India next year. Ducati saved the best for last as part of its six-part motorcycle teaser campaign as it unveiled the new DesertX adventure motorcycle. The Ducati DesertX 2022 […]]]>


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The Ducati DesertX made its world debut as an adventure bike inspired by Ducati’s iconic Dakar machines from the 90s. The bike will arrive in India next year.

Ducati saved the best for last as part of its six-part motorcycle teaser campaign as it unveiled the new DesertX adventure motorcycle. The Ducati DesertX 2022 is taking shape as a production-ready motorcycle after starting life as a concept in 2019 at EICMA. The new DesertX brings retro charm with the ability to go anywhere and there are a lot of cool elements that make us eagerly await its arrival in India. The DesertX gets a charming retro style design and the Ducati 937 cc, Testastretta L-twin which is used in the Ducati Panigale V2, among other models. On the DesertX, the motor has a slightly different tuning state, as well as different gears.

Also read: EICMA 2019: Ducati DesertX Scrambler concept unveiled

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The Ducati DesertX was first presented as a concept at EICMA 2019 and remains quite close to the concept

The Ducati DesertX stays pretty close to the concept with dual pod LED headlights taking inspiration from Ducati motorcycles that raced in Dakar in the 1990s. The bike rolls on 21-inch front and 18-inch rear spoke wheels with a tubeless design. The bodywork also closely follows the Dakar bikes also serves this purpose with two fuel tanks under the hull.

Essentially, the main fuel tank has a capacity of 21 liters, while a second rear-mounted auxiliary tank is available with an additional capacity of eight liters. Fuel transfer from the front tank to the rear tank is activated when the fuel level drops below a certain point in the main tank. The bike then prompts the rider to change the fuel source.

Also read: Ducati DesertX Global Preview Details Announced

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Double nacelle headlights and styling are inspired by Dakar winning Ducati motorcycles of the 90s

Power-wise, the Ducati DesertX swapped the concept’s air-cooled engine for a more practical 937cc Testastretta 11-degree twin-cylinder engine that also works on the Multistrada 950 and the new Monster. The engine develops 108 hp at 9250 rpm and 92 Nm of maximum torque at 6500 rpm. The engine is mated to a 6-speed gearbox with a wide-ratio setup with shorter first and second gears that help crawl, while the higher sixth gear aims for better highway touring ability.

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The DesertX receives two fuel tanks with a 21 liter main unit and an 8 liter auxiliary unit

Suspension functions are provided by Kayaba with 46mm front forks with 230mm travel. The rear receives a single shock absorber with 220 mm of travel. The seat height on the bike is 875mm with a ground clearance of 250mm, making it quite a challenge. But expect the option of a lower seat height on the bike as an accessory. Braking performance comes from Brembo with M50 four-piston calipers with dual discs up front that use an axial master cylinder.

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The 2022 Ducati DesertX 937 cc Testastretta 11-degree twin-cylinder engine that develops 108 hp and 92 Nm

As for electronics, the DesertX will have six riding modes, including Enduro and Rally modes. There is also cornering ABS which can be completely deactivated in the two off-road-specific driving modes. All controls are accessible using the 5 inch TFT screen while electronic aids on the bike include IMU assisted traction control, wheel control, engine brake control, cruise control and a two-way quickshifter. Ducati claims an empty weight of 223 kg on the DesertX. The motorcycle is expected to arrive in India by the end of 2022.

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2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 First Look (14 Highlights: Production Model) https://motostays.com/2022-husqvarna-norden-901-first-look-14-highlights-production-model/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 09:14:53 +0000 https://motostays.com/2022-husqvarna-norden-901-first-look-14-highlights-production-model/ [ad_1] Two years after the concept bike was revealed to the public, the Husqvarna Norden 901 2022 is here. It turns out to be an off-road-ready adventure touring machine. Although it shares parts with various variants of the KTM 890 Adventure, let’s start from scratch with the new Norden. Power comes from an 889cm DOHC […]]]>


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Two years after the concept bike was revealed to the public, the Husqvarna Norden 901 2022 is here. It turns out to be an off-road-ready adventure touring machine. Although it shares parts with various variants of the KTM 890 Adventure, let’s start from scratch with the new Norden.

2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 First Look: MSRP

  1. Power comes from an 889cm DOHC parallel twin. Decidedly too square, the 2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 resists the temptation to be a high-speed. Peak torque of 74 lb-ft comes to a manageable 6,500 rpm, with the 100 horsepower peak registering at 8,000 rpm. Reliability is ensured by forged camshafts, SLC coated finger lifters, steel intake and exhaust valves, hydraulic cam chain tensioner, two oil pumps, plain bearing crankshaft, forged pistons with three bridged-box segments (each served by two oil jets), and a knock sensor in the cylinder head. The gap between service intervals exceeds 9,000 miles.
  1. Three driving modes are standard, with an optional Explorer mode. Using ride-by-wire technology and an IMU, Street and Offroad modes optimize power and electronic aids to reflect usage. Street mode has a sharper throttle response and more aggressive traction control compared to Offroad mode. Offroad mode dampens power, while still allowing the rider to roll and steer with the rear. In addition, the cornering detection function on the traction control is a feature reserved for the street. Rain mode decreases power output, slows throttle response and provides maximum traction control. Explorer Mode gives the rider the flexibility to change various mode settings to their liking – this is a software upgrade. Cruise control is standard.
  1. Traction control for deceleration is handled in several ways on the 2022 Husqvarna Norden 901. ABS is switchable between standard Offroad mode and Offroad mode only on the front wheels. In Street ABS mode, the Bosch 9.1 MP ABS system knows you are leaning over and reacts accordingly. To downshift there’s a slip clutch, which is augmented by corner-sensitive traction control. If you downshift too quickly for the slip clutch to correct, the electronic traction control smoothly reduces power output to prevent skidding or hopping. Traction control also kicks in on the street if the front wheel leaves the ground, slowing acceleration. For those who don’t like traction control, it can be cut and the slip clutch will act on its own.

2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 first look: price

  1. In addition to a slipper function, the clutch also has assistance to lighten traction.
  1. Clutch usage will be minimized with a standard quickshifter. The six-speed transmission has a short lever stroke for gearshifting, making gear changes faster. The top three speeds are glass bead blasted for added durability.
  1. Juan brakes work with Bosch ABS. The calipers may sport the Husqvarna logo, but they are J. Juan units with the dual front calipers mounted radially. In case you missed it, Brembo bought out Barcelona-based J. Juan in April for 70 million euros (roughly $ 85 million).

2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 first look: for sale

  1. The lattice frame of the 2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 uses chromoly tubing for increased strength, reduced weight and optimized flex. The frame puts the rider forward on the frame for more weight on the front wheel; the frame is kept short (front to back) so that a longer swingarm improving traction can be deployed. A non-adjustable steering damper improves stability. The frame is black powder coated to maintain its appearance longer in off-road conditions.
  1. Aggressive large-block Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires on a 21/18 inch wheel set demonstrate that the Norden is all-terrain oriented. Husqvarna wasn’t cheap here, or worried about tire longevity – these Pirellis are good rubber if you’re going to be riding off-road. If you plan to stay on the roadway of your Norden, put on a street-suitable tire before leaving the dealership. Someone will be happy to buy your Rally STRs.
  1. WP takes care of the suspension. Apex units are used at both ends of the motorcycle. The cantilever damper is not assisted by a linkage and does not provide progressive damping. Spring preload is adjustable via a three-pin knob, and only rebound damping is adjustable. Bring a Torx screwdriver for the hexalobular head. The fork is an open cartridge design with compression and rebound dampers in separate fork tubes. Aluminum triple clamps hold the WP Apex fork in place. Although the damping is fully adjustable on the fork, the spring preload is fixed. Suspension wheel travel is 8.7 inches at the front and 8.5 inches at the rear.

2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 first look: specifications

  1. The ergonomics can be adjusted to suit the rider. There are six positions for mounting the tapered aluminum handlebars, with an adjustment range of almost 1.2 inches. The ribbed seat can be installed in one of two positions — 6 or 34.4 inches above the floor. The aluminum footpegs have removable rubber inserts – leave them to dampen vibrations on the street and remove them for better grip off-road boots. In addition, the rubber inserts slightly increase the position of the footrest, another way to adjust the rider’s triangle. A two-position rear brake lever cap is a nice touch: one is suitable for city boots, while the other offers room for all-terrain boots. If you plan to ride in cold weather, a heated seat is optional.
  1. The full-length ADV fairing of the Husqvarna Norden 901 2022 houses several features. Right away you will notice the standard LED lighting and fog lights. There is a 12 volt outlet to power a GPS device. The five-inch TFT dashboard connects to your smartphone via Bluetooth and the Husqvarna Motorcycles Ride app, but only if you get the optional connectivity unit, which adds turn-by-turn navigation and interfaces for phone calls and the music. Although the fairing appears bulky, a Husqvarna insider describes the body as “thin” and offers “easy movement and exceptional ergonomics for all sizes of riders.” The fairing has spoilers which improve stability at high speeds.

2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 first look: pictures

  1. Don’t hesitate to explore at least 200 miles between visits to a gas station. The tank even holds five gallons and Husqvarna claims a maximum range of 248 miles.
  1. Important accessories will be available for the Norden. Touratech suitcases and top cases lead the way. There is also an Akrapovič titanium silencer (replaces the stainless steel unit), lowering children (lowers the seat height by almost an inch), soft luggage, heated grips and a higher windshield. .

2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 First Look: Adventure Touring Motorcycle

  1. The 2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 has an MSRP of $ 13,999 and will be available in the United States in November. Competitors include the BMW F 850 ​​GS Adventure ($ 14,399), Honda Africa Twin ($ 13,545), KTM 890 Adventure R ($ 14,199), Suzuki V-Strom 1050XT ($ 14,799) and the Triumph Tiger 900 Rally ($ 15,400). Look for our review of the Norden in the coming weeks.

Location photograph by Rudi Schedl

2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 Specifications

MOTOR

  • Type: Parallel Twin
  • Displacement: 889cc
  • Bore x stroke: 90.7 x 68.8 mm
  • Maximum power: 100 horsepower at 8000 rpm
  • Maximum torque: 74 ft-lbs at 6500 rpm
  • Compression ratio: 13.5: 1
  • Valvetrain: DOHC, 8 valves
  • Refueling: Dell’Orto with 46mm throttle body
  • Lubrication: Semi-dry sump pressure lubrication with 2 oil pumps
  • Transmission: 6 speeds with quickshifter
  • Clutch: assisted clutch and PASC traction control
  • Final drive: 520 X-ring chain

FRAME

  • Frame: chromoly tubular steel with stressed motor and chromoly trellis subframe
    Handlebar: Tapered aluminum
  • Front suspension; Travel: Fully adjustable WP Apex 43mm open cartridge inverted fork; 8.7 inch
  • Rear suspension; travel: adjustable WP Apex damper without linkage, spring preload and rebound damping; 8.5 inch
  • Wheels: metal spoked with tubeless aluminum rims
  • Front wheel: 2.50 x 21
  • Rear wheel: 4.50 x 18
  • Tires: Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR
  • Front tire: 90/90 x 21
  • Rear tire: 150/70 x 18
  • Brakes, front: 320mm rotors with J.Juan 4-piston radial-mount calipers
  • Rear brake: 260mm disc with J.Juan 2-piston floating caliper
  • ABS: Bosch 9.1 MP Street-aware in turns and offroad

DIMENSIONS and CAPACITIES

  • Wheelbase: 59.5 inches
  • Rake: 25.8 degrees
  • Seat height: 33.6 or 34.4 inches
  • Ground clearance: 9.9 inches
  • Fuel capacity: 5.0 gallons
  • Curb weight: 480 pounds

2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 Price: $ 13,999 MSRP

2022 Husqvarna Norden 901 Photo gallery


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With 50 years of riding experience, Don Williams is a fan of all kinds of motorcycles. He enjoys sport bikes, cruisers, dirt bikes, touring bikes, adventure bikes, double sport bikes and custom rides. Ask Don what his favorite bike is and he’ll say, “Whichever bike I’m on.

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